Category Archives: News

Richard Avedon and James Baldwin’s joint examination of American identity | The New Yorker

“Native New Yorkers Richard Avedon (1923-2004) and James Baldwin (1924-1987) met as students at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx in the late 1930s. They became friends while writing for and editing The Magpie, the school’s literary magazine. Even as teenagers, they, in their writing, dealt with profound issues of race, mortality, and, as Avedon wrote, ‘the future of humanity’ as World War II closed in on them,” according to Pace/MacGill Gallery.

The New Yorker writes about the upcoming exhibit at Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York:

In 1964, Richard Avedon and James Baldwin published “Nothing Personal,” their collaborative exploration of American identity. This fall, a facsimile edition will be released, along with a set of previously unpublished photographs, and an introduction by Hilton Als, which is excerpted here. An exhibit of material from the book goes on view at Pace/MacGill Gallery on November 17th.

Source: Richard Avedon and James Baldwin’s Joint Examination of American Identity | The New Yorker

Daniel Berehulak, E. Jason Wambsgans win 2017 Pulitzer Prizes

NEW YORK — Daniel Berehulak, a freelance photojournalist based out of Mexico City, won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News Photography for his reportage of the human toll of the Philippine war on drugs launched by President Rodrigo Duterte.

Daniel Berehulak
Daniel Berehulak

Berehulak, a three-time Pulitzer finalist and two-time winner, documented 57 homicides in 35 days in chilling detail in the capital of Manila.

The photo reportage, titled ‘They Are Slaughtering Us Like Animals,’ depicted the aftermath of extrajudicial killings on urban streets — from the bloody crime scenes to the child mourners left behind, from the victims’ empty homes to the overworked funeral homes that struggle to deal with the body count of vigilante violence.

“For powerful storytelling through images published in The New York Times showing the callous disregard for human life in the Philippines brought about by a government assault on drug dealers and users,” the Pulitzer Prize jury wrote.

E. Jason Wambsgans of the Chicago Tribune won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in Feature Photography.

The jury wrote that the prize was awarded “for a superb portrayal of a 10-year-old boy and his mother striving to put the boy’s life back together after he survived a shooting in Chicago.”

The FENCE submission deadline is about to close

The deadline for photographers to submit to The FENCE, a large-scale outdoor photography exhibit that will be seen in seven cities, is about to close on Tuesday, April 11, 2017.

The project, which debuted in 2012 at Brooklyn Bridge Park, was conceived by United Photo Industries and Photo District News in 2011, establishing a popular public photography event.

The FENCE is a series of large-scale photography exhibitions printed on vinyl mesh and installed outdoors in 7 cities: Boston, Brooklyn, Atlanta, Houston, Santa Fe, Durham and Denver. Each exhibition is on public view for a minimum of 3 months in areas with massive pedestrian traffic, ensuring an unprecedented audience for your work.

via The FENCE 2017

Magnum photos announces new members

Moises Saman was named the newest full member of Magnum Photos at the organization’s annual meeting in New York this week.

A former Newsday staff photographer, the Peruvian-born Saman focused on covering the post-9/11 world, spending time in Afghanistan, Iraq and other Middle Eastern countries. Leaving the New York-based newspaper, he became a freelancer with Panos Pictures in 2007 and has since received numerous awards from the likes of World Press Photo.

In 2010, he was invited to join Magnum Photos as a nominee.

Magnum Photos also announced new associate members Bieke Depoorter and Jérôme Sessini, and nominee Sohrab Hura.

The agency’s 67th annual meeting kicked off at International Center of Photography, with a reception for the Magnum Contact Sheets exhibition at MILK Gallery. The event concluded at NeueHouse.

via Magnum Photos Blog.

U.S. Supreme Court upholds mobile-phone privacy

A unanimous U.S. Supreme Court decision upheld the privacy rights of mobile phones belonging to people who are arrested.

This is a bold opinion,” Orin S. Kerr, a law professor at George Washington University, told The New York Times. “It is the first computer-search case, and it says we are in a new digital age. You can’t apply the old rules anymore.”

In the written decision, Chief Justice John Roberts noted in Riley v. California that mobile phones commonly contain “a digital record of nearly every aspect of their lives — from the mundane to the intimate.”

Roberts also acknowledged the multipurpose nature  of mobile phones.

“They could just as easily be called cameras, video players, Rolodexes, calendars, tape recorders, libraries, diaries, albums, televisions, maps or newspapers,” he wrote.

The court also prohibited the deletion of data contained within mobile phones, or their confiscation.

“Digital data stored on a cell phone cannot itself be used as a weapon to harm an arresting officer or to effectuate the arrestee’s escape. Officers may examine the phone’s physical aspects to ensure that it will not be used as a weapon, but the data on the phone can endanger no one,” Roberts wrote.

The specific language is notable, as police departments have claimed in numerous seizure cases that they had “feared” for their lives from the phone as a potential weapon. The claim is made constantly on photo-rights blog Photography Is Not A Crime.

The court also carved out a right to privacy distinct inherent in digital devices from physical searches at the time of arrest.

“A conclusion that inspecting the contents of an arrestee’s pockets works no substantial additional intrusion on privacy beyond the arrest itself may make sense as applied to physical items, but more substantial privacy interests are at stake when digital data is involved,” the decision stated.

(via Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant to Search Cell Phones | Photography is Not a Crime)

N.Y. cameraman wins $200,000 police settlement

News cameraman Philip Datz won a $200,000 settlement from the Suffolk County Police Department stemming from his 2011 arrest at the scene of an investigation.

Phil Datz, left, and his attorney, Robert Balin. Datz sued Suffolk County police after he was arrested following an order to stop videotaping the arrest of a suspect. (credit: Mona Rivera, 1010 WINS)

“This settlement is a victory for the First Amendment and for the public good,” Datz said. “When police arrest journalists just for doing their job, it creates a chilling effect that jeopardizes everyone’s ability to stay informed about important news in their community. Journalists have a duty to cover what the police are doing, and the police should follow the law and respect the First Amendment to ensure they can do that.”

In addition to the monetary award, the county also agreed to implement a new training program and create a Police-Media Relations Committee, according to the National Press Photographers Association.

In a video of the arrest, Suffolk County Police Sergeant Michael Milton tells Datz repeatedly to “go away.”

“I’ve been doing this for 30 years,” Milton says. “There’s nothing you can hold over my head or anybody out there.”

via New York Photojournalist Wins $200,000 Settlement from Viral Video Incident